Flower

Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

Call To Worship June 11 2017

“Equally striking is it to observe the particular person whom God selected to entertain Elijah. It was not a rich merchant or one of the chief men of Zidon, but a poor widow—desolate and dependent—who was made both willing and able to minister unto him. It is usually God’s way, and to His glory, to make use of and place honour upon “the weak and foolish things of this world.” In commenting upon the “ravens” which brought bread and flesh to the Prophet while he sojourned by the brook, we called attention to the sovereignty of God and the strangeness of the instruments He is pleased to employ. The same truth is vividly illustrated here: a poor widow! a Gentile dwelling in Zidon, the original home of Jezebel! Think it not strange then, my reader, if God’s dealings with you have been the very opposite of what you had expected. The Lord is a law to Himself, and implicit trust and unreserved submission is what He requires from us.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth, 1991, pg. 55)

Call To Worship June 4 2017

“Instead of a river God often gives us a brook, which may be running today and dried up tomorrow. Why? To teach us not to rest in our blessings, but in the Blesser Himself. Yet is it not at this very point that we so often fail—our hearts being far more occupied with the gifts than with the Giver? Is not this just the reason why the Lord will not trust us with a river?—because it would unconsciously take His place in our hearts. “Jeshurun waxed fat, and kicked: thou art waxen fat, thou art grown thick, thou art covered with fatness; then he forsook God which made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation” (Deu 32:15). And the same evil tendency exists within us, We sometimes feel that we are being harshly dealt with because God gives us a brook rather than a river, but this is because we are so little acquainted with our own hearts. God loves His own too well to place dangerous knives in the hands of infants.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth, 1991, pg. 38)

Call to Worship April 28, 2017

“The task which now confronted Elijah was no ordinary one, and it called for more than common courage. For an untutored rustic of the hills to appear uninvited before a king who defied heaven was sufficient to quell the bravest…What likelihood, then, was there of this lonely Gileadite escaping with his life? “But the righteous are bold as a lion” (Pro 28:1)…The hour for the execution of his stem task had arrived, and Elijah leaves his home in Gilead to deliver unto Ahab his message of judgment. Picture him on his long and lonely journey. What were the subjects which engaged his mind? Would he be reminded of the similar mission on which Moses had embarked, when he was sent by the Lord to deliver his ultimatum to the haughty monarch of Egypt? Well, the message which he bore would be no more palatable to the degenerate king of Israel. Yet such a recollection need in nowise deter or intimidate him: rather should the remembrance of the sequel strengthen his faith. The Lord God had not failed his servant Moses, but had stretched forth His mighty arm on his behalf, and in the end had given him full success. The wondrous works of God in the past should ever hearten His servants and saints in the present.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth, 1991, pg. 17)

Call To Worship May 7 2017

“It was openly declared that Baal lived and that Jehovah ceased to be. What a shocking state of things had come to pass…Defiance of the Lord God and blatant wickedness had now reached its culminating point…Now it was in the midst of this spiritual darkness and degradation there appeared on the stage of public action, with dramatic suddenness, a solitary but striking witness to and for the living God. An eminent commentator began his remarks upon 1 Kings 17 by saying, “the most illustrious Prophet Elijah was raised up in the reign of the most wicked of the kings of Israel.” That is a terse but accurate summing up of the situation in Israel at that time: not only so, but it supplies the key to all that follows. It is truly saddening to contemplate the awful conditions which then prevailed. Every light had been extinguished, every voice of divine testimony was hushed. Spiritual death was spread over everything, and it looked as though Satan had indeed obtained complete mastery of the situation.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth 1991, pg. 12-13)

Call To Worship April 16 2017

“The proverb has it that Hunger is the best cook. The Law makes afflicted consciences hungry for Christ. Christ tastes good to them. Hungry hearts appreciate Christ. Thirsty souls are what Christ wants. He invites them: “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” Christ’s benefits are so precious that He will dispense them only to those who need them and really desire them.” Martin Luther, Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians

Call To Worship March 26 2017

“We observe a certain assumption operating in [Joshua] 4:1-10, namely, that the greatest enemy of faith may be forgetfulness (cf. Deut. 8). Just as in marriage, the real threat may not be infidelity but simply a slow process of forgetting and a gradual failure to remember the preciousness of the other person. So, Joshua says, you must remember what Yahweh has done; and these stones are to serve as visual aids to that end.”

(Dale Ralph Davis, Joshua: No Falling Words, [Christian Focus, 2000], pg. 39.)

Call To Worship March 19 2017

“By reconciliation is meant the whole work of redemption. The Scripture has various terms for our recovery by Christ, which all amount to one thing, but imply the variety of our misery by sin, and the full proportion of the remedy to all our capacities in that misery. Our fall put us under various relations; our Saviour has cut those knots, and tied new ones of a contrary nature. It is called reconciliation as it respects us as enemies, salvation as it respects us in a state of damnation, propitiation as we are guilty, redemption as captives, and bound over to punishment. Reconciliation, justification, and adoption differ thus: in reconciliation, God is considered as the supreme Lord and the injured party, and man is considered as an enemy that has wronged him; in justification, God is considered as a judge, and man as guilty; in adoption, God is considered as a father, and man as an alien. Reconciliation makes us friends, justification makes us righteous, adoption makes us heirs.”
(Stephen Charnock)

Call To Worship March 12 2017

“Reconciliation is the reintegration of friendship between parties before at variance, both parties being properly said to be reconciled, even both he that offends and he that is offended…Reconciliation is the renewing of lost friendship, the slaying of enmity, the making up of peace, the appeasing of God, and turning away of his wrath.”

(John Owen, Death of Death in the Death of Christ, ch. IV.)

Call To Worship March 5 2017

“2 Cor. 5:18-19, These words are small in bulk, but great in mystery, it is the heads of the gospel in a nut-shell; the most sparkling diamond in the whole golden ring of Scripture. It comprehends the counsels of eternity and the transactions of time. A wonder in heaven, God bringing forth a man-child to be a propitiation for sin, which was the Jews’ stumbling-block and the Gentiles’ scoff. 1 Cor. i. 23, 24; but wherein the wisdom and grace of God’s counsel in heaven, and the power of his actions on earth, clearly shine forth in the face of Jesus Christ…God descends to man by this in acts of wisdom and grace, and man ascends to God in acts of faith and love. If there be any mystery in Christianity more admirable than another, it is this of reconciliation. If any mystery in this mystery, it is the various and incomprehensible engagement of the Father in it, in and through Christ. If anything in Scripture sets forth this mystery in a few words like a picture in a little medal, it is this which I have read, wherein the apostle gives us a short but full and clear account of the doctrine of reconciliation, which is the substantial part of the gospel.”

(Stephen Charnock, The Works of Stephen Charnock, vol. 3, (Scriptura Press, NY, NY;

Call To Worship February 26 2017

“The conduct of this suffering Jewess may well put to shame many a strong and healthy professing Christian. How many in the full enjoyment of bodily vigor, allow the most frivolous excuses to keep them away from the house of God! How many are constantly spending the whole Sunday in idleness, pleasure-seeking, or business, and scoffing and sneering at those who ‘keep the Sabbath holy!’…How many find religious services a weariness while they attend them, and feel relieved when they are over! How few know anything of David’s spirit, when he said, ‘I was glad when they said to me, Let us go into the house of the Lord.’ ‘How lovely are your tabernacles, O Lord of Hosts!’ (Psalm 122:1; Psalm 84:1.)

Now what is the explanation of all this?…The most have no heart for God’s service. They have no delight in God’s presence or God’s day. ‘The carnal mind is enmity against God.’ The moment a man’s heart is converted, these pretended difficulties about attending public worship vanish away. The new heart finds no trouble in keeping the Sabbath holy. Where there is a will there is always a way.

Let us never forget that our feelings about Sundays are sure tests of the state of our souls. The man who can find no pleasure in giving God one day in the week, is manifestly unfit for heaven. Heaven itself is nothing but an eternal Sabbath. If we cannot enjoy a few hours in God’s service once a week in this world, it is plain that we could not enjoy an eternity in His service in the world to come. Happy are those who walk in the steps of her of whom we read today! They shall find Christ and a blessing while they live, and Christ and glory when they die.”

(J.C. Ryle, Luke: Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, vol. 2, [Banner of Truth, 2012], pg. 89-90)