Flower

Archive for the ‘Quotes’ Category

Call To Worship October 15 2017

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 6:1-11

“We should weigh carefully the nature of our Lord Jesus Christ’s teaching about the observance of the Sabbath, both here and in other places. We must not allow ourselves to be carried away by the common notion that the Sabbath is a mere Jewish ordinance, and that it was abolished and done away by Christ. There is not a single passage of the Gospels which proves this. In every case where we find our Lord speaking upon it, He speaks against the false views of it, which were taught by the Pharisees, but not against the day itself. He cleanses and purifies the fourth commandment from the man-made additions by which the Jews had defiled it, but never declares that it was not to bind Christians. He shows that the seventh day’s rest was not meant to prevent works of necessity and mercy, but He says nothing to imply that it was to pass away, as a part of the ceremonial law.

We live in days when anything like strict Sabbath observance is loudly denounced, in some quarters, as a remnant of Jewish superstition. We are boldly told by some people, that to keep the Sabbath holy is legal, and that to enforce the fourth commandment on Christians, is going back to bondage. Let it suffice us to remember, when we hear such things, that assertions are not proofs, and that vague talk like this has no confirmation in the word of God. Let us settle it in our minds, that the fourth commandment has never been repealed by Christ, and that we have no more right to break the Sabbath day, under the Gospel, than we have to murder and to steal.

The architect who repairs a building, and restores it to its proper use, is not the destroyer of it, but the preserver. The Savior who redeemed the Sabbath from Jewish traditions, and so frequently explained its true meaning, ought never to be regarded as the enemy of the fourth commandment. On the contrary, He has “magnified it, and made it honorable.”

Let us cling to our Sabbath, as the best safeguard of our Country’s religion. Let us defend it against the assaults of ignorant and mistaken men, who would gladly turn the day of God into a day of business and pleasure. Above all, let us each strive to keep the day holy ourselves. Much of our spiritual prosperity depends, under God, on the manner in which we employ our Sundays.”

Call To Worship, October 8, 2017

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 5:27-32

“This is that great lesson of the Gospel which, in one form or another, we find continually taught in the New Testament. It is one which we can never have too strongly impressed upon our minds. Such is our natural ignorance and self-righteousness in religion, that we are constantly losing sight of it. We need to be frequently reminded, that Jesus did not come merely as a teacher, but as the Savior of that which was utterly lost, and that those only can receive benefit from Him who will confess that they are ruined, bankrupt, hopeless, miserable sinners.

Let us use this mighty truth, if we never used it before. Are we sensible of our own wickedness and sinfulness? Do we feel that we are unworthy of anything but wrath and condemnation? Then let us understand that we are the very people for whose sake Jesus came into the world. If we feel ourselves righteous, Christ has nothing to say to us. But if we feel ourselves sinners, Christ calls us to repentance. Let not the call be made in vain.

Let us go on using this mighty truth, if we have used it in time past. Do we find our own hearts weak and deceitful? Do we often feel that “when we would do good, evil is present with us?” (Rom. 7:21.) It may be all true, but it must not prevent our resting on Christ. He “came in to the world to save sinners,” and if we feel ourselves such, we have warrant for applying to, and trusting in Him to our life’s end. One thing only let us never forget — Christ came to call us to repentance, and not to sanction our continuing in sin.”

Call to Worship October 1 2017

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 5:1-26

“In measuring these words of Peter, we must of course remember the time at which they were spoken. He was, at best, but a babe in grace, weak in faith, weak in experience, and weak in knowledge. At a later period in his life he would, doubtless, have said, ‘Abide with me,’ and not, ‘depart.’ But still, after every deduction of this kind, the words of Peter exactly express the first feelings of man when he is brought into anything like close contact with God. The sight of divine greatness and holiness makes him feel strongly his own littleness and sinfulness. Like Adam after the fall, his first thought is to hide himself. Like Israel under Sinai, the language of his heart is, ‘let not God speak with us, lest we die.’ (Exod. 20:19.)
Let us strive to know more and more, every year we live, our need of a mediator between ourselves and God. Let us seek more and more to realize that without a mediator our thoughts of God can never be comfortable, and the more clearly we see God the more uncomfortable we must feel. Above all, let us be thankful that we have in Jesus the very Mediator whose help our souls require, and that through Him we may draw near to God with boldness, and cast fear away. Out of Christ, God is a consuming fire. In Christ, He is a reconciled Father. Without Christ, the strictest moralist may well tremble, as he looks forward to his end. Through Christ, the chief of sinners may approach God with confidence, and feel perfect peace.”

Call To Worship September 17 2017

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle

Luke 3:1-6

We must carefully bear in mind that no repentance can make atonement for sin. The blood of Christ, and nothing else, can wash away sin from man’s soul. No quantity of repentance can ever justify us in the sight of God. “We are accounted righteous before God, only for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ, by faith, and not for our own works or deservings.” It is of the utmost importance to understand this clearly. The trouble that men bring upon their souls, by misunderstanding this subject, is more than can be expressed.

But while we say all this, we must carefully remember that without repentance no soul was ever yet saved. We must know our sins, mourn over them, forsake them, abhor them, or else we shall never enter the kingdom of heaven. There is nothing meritorious in this. It forms no part whatever of the price of our redemption. Our salvation is all of grace, from first to last. But the great fact still remains, that saved souls are always penitent souls, and that saving faith in Christ, and true repentance toward God, are never found asunder. This is a mighty truth, and one that ought never to be forgotten.

Do we ourselves repent? This, after all, is the question which most nearly concerns us. Have we been convinced of sin by the Holy Spirit? Have we fled to Jesus for deliverance from the wrath to come? Do we know anything of a broken and contrite heart, and a thorough hatred of sin? Can we say, “I repent,” as well as “I believe?” If not, let us not delude our minds with the idea that our sins are yet forgiven. It is written, “Except you repent, you shall all likewise perish.” (Luke 13:3.)

Call To Worship September 10 2017

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle

Luke 2:41-52

JESUS AND HIS PARENTS AT THE PASSOVER

These verses should always be deeply interesting to a reader of the Bible. They record the only facts which we know about our Lord Jesus Christ during the first thirty years of His life on earth, after His infancy. How many things a Christian would like to know about the events of those thirty years, and the daily history of the house at Nazareth! But we need not doubt that there is wisdom in the silence of Scripture on the subject. If it had been good for us to know more, more would have been revealed…Let us, in the last place, draw from this passage, an example for all true Christians. We have it in the solemn words which our Lord addressed to His mother Mary, when she said to Him, “Son, why have you dealt with us thus?” “Know you not,” was the reply, “that I must be about my father’s business?” A mild reproof was evidently implied in that reply. It was meant to remind His mother that He was no common person, and had come into the world to do no common work. It was a hint that she was insensibly forgetting that He had come into the world in no ordinary way, and that she could not expect Him to be ever dwelling quietly at Nazareth. It was a solemn [reminder] that, as God, He had a Father in heaven, and that this heavenly Father’s work demanded His first attention.

The expression is one that ought to sink down deeply into the hearts of all Christ’s people. It should supply them with a mark at which they should aim in daily life, and a test by which they should try their habits and conversation. It should quicken them when they begin to be slothful. It should check them when they feel inclined to go back to the world. “Are we about our Father’s business? Are we walking in the steps of Jesus Christ?” Such questions will often prove very humbling, and make us ashamed of ourselves. But such questions are eminently useful to our souls. Never is a Church in so healthy a condition as when its believing members aim high, and strive in all things to be like Christ.

Call To Worship August 2017

We worship our God who created the soul of man, therefore he knows souls perfectly. No matter the depth of despair, God alone ultimately sustains and keeps the souls of every person according to His will. Trusting His will means even during the depths of despondency. Do we really trust that the one who created us and sent His Son to die for us can care for us as well? Will we trust the Son who died for us to tell us how to live our lives? He trusted the Father in the greatest of all times of despair. He commands us to repent, believe and trust that the Father knows and will faithfully complete His will in and through us according to His good pleasure. Let us pray that we trust the Lord who truly knows how we are to live each and every day according to his word and precepts.

“Behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to render to every man according to what he has done. “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.” Revelation 22:12-13

Spiritual Depression

Call To Worship August 13 2017

Mr. Help, said, “It is not the pleasure of the King that this place should remain so bad (Isa. 35:3-4); his labourers, also, have, by the directions of his Majesty’s surveyors, been, for above these sixteen hundred years, employed about this patch of ground, if, perhaps, it might have been mended; yea, and to my knowledge, said he, here have been swallowed up at least twenty thousand cart-loads; yea, millions of wholesome instructions, that have, at all seasons, been brought from all places of the King’s dominions, and they that can tell, say, they are the best materials to make good ground of the place, if so be it might have been mended; but it is the Slough of Despond still; and so will be when they have done what they can…True, there are, by the direction of the Lawgiver, certain good and substantial steps, placed even through the very midst of this slough; but at such time as this place doth much spew out its filth, as it doth against change of weather, these steps are hardly seen; or if they be, men, through the dizziness of their heads, step besides, and then they are bemired to purpose, notwithstanding the steps be there; but the ground is good, when they are once got in at the gate (1Sa 12:23).” John Bunyan, Pilgrim’s Progress,

http://www.chapellibrary.org/files/8213/7643/3312/ppro.pdf

August 6 2017 Call to Worship

“‘And it shall come to pass, that him that escapeth the sword of Hazael shall Jehu slay, and him that escapeth from the sword of Jehu shall Elisha slay’ (v. 17). Elijah had wrought faithfully, but Israel had to be dealt with by other agents: the three men whom he was told to anoint would in their turn bring down judgment upon the land. God was infinitely more jealous of His own honour than His servant could be, and He would by no means desert His cause or suffer His enemies to triumph as the Prophet feared. But mark the variety of the instruments which God was pleased to employ: Hazael, king of Syria; Jehu, the rude captain of Israel; and Elisha, a young farmer. Each was as different as possible and yet each one was needed for some special work in connection with that idolatrous people at that time. Ah, “the eye cannot say to the hand, I have no need of thee; nor again the head to the feet, I have no reed of you” (1Co 12:21). Yea, as some of the smaller and frailer members of the body perform the most useful and essential offices, so it is often by the most unlettered and apparently unqualified men that God accomplishes the chief exploits in His kingdom.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth, 1991, pg. 247.)

Call To Worship July 30 2017

“In the startling contrasts here presented we have a striking proof of the divine inspiration of the Scriptures. In the Bible human nature is painted in its true colours: the characters of its heroes are faithfully depicted, the sins of its noteworthy persons are frankly recorded. True, it is human to err, but equally true it is human to conceal the blemishes of those we most admire. Had the Bible been a human production, written by uninspired historians, they had magnified the virtues of the most illustrious men of their nation, and ignored their vices, or if mentioned at all glossed over them and attempts made to extenuate the same. Had some human admirer chronicled the history of Elijah, his sad failure would have been omitted. The fact that it is recorded, that no effort is made to excuse it, is evidence that the characters of the Bible are painted in the colours of truth and reality, that they were not sketched by human hands, but that its historians were controlled by the Holy Spirit.”

(A.W. Pink, The Life of Elijah, Banner of Truth, 1991, pg. 190-191.)