Flower

Regeneration & Retribution

Call to Worship April 8 2018

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke
J.C. Ryle Luke 11:14-20

“Let us notice, secondly, in these verses — the amazing power of prejudice over the hearts of unconverted men. We read, that when our Lord cast out the mute spirit, there were some who said, “He casts out devils through Beelzebub, the chief of the devils!” They could not deny the miracle. They then refused to allow that it was wrought by divine power. The work before their eyes was plain and indisputable. They then attempted to discredit the character of Him who did the miracle, and to blacken His reputation by saying that he was in league with the devil.
The state of mind here described is a most formidable sin — and sadly, it is very common. There are never lacking people who are determined to see no good in the servants of Christ, and to believe all kind of evil reports about them. Such people appear to throw aside their common sense. They refuse to listen to evidence, or to attend to plain arguments. They seem resolved to believe that whatever a Christian does must be wrong — and whatever he says must be false! If he does right at any time — then it must be from corrupt motives! If he speaks truth — then it must be with sinister views! If he does good works — then it is from selfish reasons! If he casts out devils — then it is through the power of Beelzebub!

Such prejudiced people are to be found in many a congregation. They are the severest trials of the ministers of Christ. It is no wonder that Paul said, “Pray that we may be delivered from unreasonable as well as wicked men.” (2 Thessalonians 3:2.)

Let us strive to be of a fair, and honest, and candid spirit in our judgment of men and things in religion. Let us be ready to give up old and cherished opinions, the moment that anyone can show us a “more excellent way.” The honest and good heart is a great treasure. (Luke 8:15.)

A prejudiced spirit is the very jaundice of the soul. It affects a man’s mental eyesight, and makes him see everything in an unnatural color. From such a spirit, may we pray to be delivered!”

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke
J.C. Ryle Luke 11:20-26
“Let us observe in these verses — what a fearful picture our Lord draws of Satan’s power. There are four points in His description, which are peculiarly instructive.

Christ speaks of Satan as a “STRONG man.” The strength of Satan has been only too well proved by his victories over the souls of men. He who tempted Adam and Eve to rebel against God, and brought sin into the world — he who has led captive the vast majority of mankind, and robbed them of Heaven — that evil one is indeed a mighty foe! He who is called the “Prince of this world” — is not an enemy to be despised. The devil is very strong.

Christ speaks of Satan as a “strong man, fully ARMED.” Satan is well supplied with defensive armor. He is not to be overcome by slight assaults, and feeble exertions. He who would overcome him, must put forth all his strength. “This kind only goes out by prayer and fasting.” And Satan is also well supplied with offensive weapons. He is never at a loss for means to injure the soul of man. He has snares of every kind — and devices of every description. He knows exactly how every rank, and class, and age, and nation, and people — can be assailed with most advantage. The devil is well armed.

Christ speaks of man’s heart as being Satan’s “palace.” The natural heart is the favorite abode of the evil one, and all its faculties and powers are his servants, and do his will. He sits upon the throne which God ought to occupy, and governs the inward man. The devil is the “spirit that works in the children of disobedience.” (Ephesians 2:2.)

Christ speaks of Satan’s “goods being at PEACE.” So long as a man is dead in trespasses and sin — so long is his heart at ease about spiritual things. He has no fear about the future. He has no anxiety about his soul. He has no dread of falling into Hell.”

All this is a FALSE PEACE no doubt. It is a sleep which cannot last, and from which there must be one day a dreadful waking. But there is such a peace beyond question. Thoughtless, stolid, reckless insensibility about eternal things — is one of the worst symptoms of the devil reigning over a man’s soul.

Let us never think lightly of the devil. That common practice of idle jesting about Satan which we may often mark in the world, is a great evil. A prisoner must be a very hardened man, who jests about the executioner and the gallows. The heart must be in a very bad state — when a man can talk with levity about Hell and the devil.

Let us thank God that there is One who is stronger even than Satan. That One is the Friend of sinners — Jesus the Son of God. As mighty as the devil is — he was overcome by Jesus on the cross, when He triumphed over him openly. As strong as the devil is — Christ can pluck his captives out of his hands, and break the chains which bind them. May we never rest until we know that deliverance by experience, and have been set free by the Son of God!

awakening

Call to Worship April 1, 2018

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke
J.C. Ryle Mark 15:39-47
“Let us notice, lastly in this passage, what honor our Lord Jesus Christ has placed on the grave, by allowing Himself to be laid in it. We read that he was “laid in a sepulcher hewn out of a rock,” and a “stone rolled unto the door.”

This is a fact that in a dying world we should always remember. It is appointed unto men once to die. We are all going to one place, and we naturally shrink from it. The coffin and the funeral, the worm and corruption, are all painful subjects. They chill us, sadden us, and fill our minds with heaviness. It is not in flesh and blood to regard them without solemn feelings. One thing, however, ought to comfort believers, and that is the thought, that the grave is “the place where they Lord once lay.” As surely as He rose again victorious from the tomb, so surely shall all who believe in Him rise gloriously in the day of His appearing. Remembering this, they may look down with calmness into the “house appointed for all living.” They may recollect that Jesus himself was once there on their behalf, and has robbed death of his sting. They may say to themselves, “the sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law — but thanks be to God who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.” (1 Cor. 15:56, 57.)

The great matter that concerns us all, is to make sure that we are spiritually buried with Christ, while we are yet alive. We must be joined to Him by faith, and conformed to His image. With Him we must die to sin, and be buried by baptism into His death. (Rom. 6:4.) With Him we must rise again and be quickened by His Spirit. Except we know these things, Christ’s death and burial will profit us nothing at all.”

Turn, Turn!

Call To Worship March 25 2018

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 11:5-13

“In these verses, our Lord Jesus Christ instructs us about prayer. The subject is one which can never be too strongly pressed on our attention. Prayer lies at the very root of our practical Christianity. It is part of the daily business of our Christian life. We have reason to thank God, that upon no point has our Lord Jesus Christ spoken so fully and frequently, as upon prayer.

We learn for one thing, from these verses — the importance of perseverance in prayer. This lesson is conveyed to us in the simple parable, commonly called the ‘Friend at Midnight.’…The application of the parable is clear and plain. If importunity succeeds so well, between man and man — then how much more may we expect it to obtain mercies, when used in prayer to God….The lesson is one which we shall do well to remember. It is far more easy to begin a habit of prayer, than to keep it up.

The secret thought comes stealing over men’s minds, that ‘it is no use to pray.’ They see no visible benefit from it. They persuade themselves that they get on just as well without prayer. Laziness and unbelief prevail over their hearts, and at last they altogether ‘diminish prayer before God.’ (Job 15:4.)

Let us resist this feeling, whenever we feel it rising within us. Let us resolve by God’s grace, that however poor and feeble our prayers may seem to be — we will pray on. It is for a very good reason that the Bible tells us so frequently — to ‘watch unto prayer,’ to ‘pray without ceasing,’ to ‘continue in prayer,’ to ‘pray always, and not to faint,’ to be ‘constant in prayer.’ These expressions all look one way. They are all meant to remind us of a danger, and to quicken us to a duty.

The time and way in which our prayers shall be answered, are matters which we must leave entirely to God. But we need not doubt that every petition which we offer in faith, shall certainly be answered. Let us lay our matters before God again and again, day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year. The answer may be long in coming, as it was in the cases of Hannah and Zachariah. (1 Samuel 1:27; Luke 1:13.) But though it tarries, let us pray on and wait for it. At the right time, it will surely come and not tarry.

We learn, for another thing, from these verses — how wide and encouraging are the promises which the Lord Jesus holds out to prayer. The striking words in which they are clothed are familiar to us if any are in the Bible, ‘Ask — and you shall receive; seek — and you shall find; knock — and it shall be opened unto you.’ The solemn declaration which follows, appears intended to make assurance doubly sure, ‘Everyone who asks — receives, and he who seeks — finds, and to him who knocks — it shall be opened.’ The heart-searching argument which concludes the passage, leaves faithlessness and unbelief without excuse, ‘If you being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children — then how much more shall your heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him.’

There are few promises in the Bible so broad and unqualified as those contained in this wonderful passage. The last in particular, deserves special notice. The Holy Spirit is beyond doubt the greatest gift which God can bestow upon man. Having this gift, we have all things — life, truth, hope and Heaven. Having this gift — we have God the Father’s boundless love, God the Son’s atoning blood, and full communion with all three Persons of the blessed Trinity. Having this gift — we have grace and peace in the present world — and glory and honor in the world to come. And yet this mighty gift is held out by our Lord Jesus Christ, as a gift to be obtained by prayer! ‘Your heavenly Father shall give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him.’”

Brood Of Vipers

Call to Worship March 18 2018

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 11:1-4

“The third division of the Lord’s Prayer, respects our daily DANGERS. We are taught to make mention of two things which we ought to fear every day, and which we must expect to meet with as long as we are in this world. One of these things is “temptation.” The other is “evil.”

We are taught to pray against TEMPTATION — “Lead us not into temptation.” We do not mean by this expression, that God is the author of evil, or that He tempts man to sin. (James 1:13.) But we entreat Him who orders all things in Heaven and earth, and without whom nothing can happen — so to order the course of our lives that we may not be tempted above what we can bear. We confess our weakness and readiness to fall. We entreat our Father to preserve us from trials — or else to make a way for us to escape. We ask that our feet may be kept from temptation, and that we may not bring discredit on our profession and misery on our souls.

We are taught, lastly, to pray against EVIL — “Deliver us from evil.” We include under the word evil — everything that can hurt us, either in body or soul — and especially every weapon of that great author of evil, the devil. We confess that ever since the fall, “That the whole world is under the control of the evil one!” (1 John 5:19.) We confess that evil is in us, and around us, and near us, and on every side — and that we have no power to deliver ourselves from it. We apply to the strong for strength. We cast ourselves on Him for protection. In short, we ask what our Savior Himself asked for us, when He said, “I do not pray that you should take them out of the world — but that you should keep them from the evil one.” (John 17:15.)”

Advancing the Gospel – Colossians 4:2-6

Call to Worship March 11 2018

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke

J.C. Ryle Luke 10:38-42

“Let us observe, for one thing — how different the characters and personalities of true Christians may be. The two sisters of whom we read in this passage were faithful disciples. Both had believed. Both had been converted. Both had honored Christ when few gave Him honor. Both loved Jesus — and Jesus loved both of them. Yet they were evidently women of very different turn of mind.

Martha was active, stirring, and impulsive, feeling strongly — and speaking out all she felt. Mary was quiet, still, and contemplative, feeling deeply — but saying less than she felt. Martha, when Jesus came to her house, rejoiced to see Him — and busied herself with preparing a suitable refreshment. Mary, also, rejoiced to see Him — but her first thought was to sit at His feet and hear His Word. Grace reigned in both hearts — but each showed the effects of grace at different times, and in different ways.

We shall find it very useful to ourselves to remember this lesson. We must not expect all believers in Christ to be exactly like one another. We must not set down others as having no grace — because their experience does not entirely tally with our own. The sheep in the Lord’s flock have each their own peculiarities. The trees in the Lord’s garden are not all precisely alike.

All true servants of God agree in the principal things of religion. All are led by one Spirit. All feel their sins — and all trust in Christ. All repent, all believe — and all are holy. But in minor matters, they often differ widely. Let not one despise another on this account. There will be Marthas and there will be Marys in the Church, until the Lord comes again!”